Skip to content

Content Header

First Kansas Colored Volunteers: Contributions of Black Union Soldiers in the Trans-Mississippi West

First Kansas Colored Volunteers: Contributions of Black Union Soldiers in the Trans-Mississippi West published on

Authored by U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

Over one hundred and eighty thousand black men fought for the Union during America’s Civil War. From infantrymen, to artillerist and cavalry soldiers, these soldiers combined to form one hundred and sixty-six Union regiments. On 29 October 1862 at Island Mound, Missouri, the First Kansas Colored Volunteers, an infantry regiment comprised mainly of blacks from Kansas and Missouri, became the first black regiment to experience combat during the Civil War. Their courage and outstanding performance in battle, as recorded, are unquestioned. What have been omitted from research thus far are their contributions to overall Union successes in the Trans-Mississippi West. Their accomplishments are remarkable, for they came in the face of extreme obstacles of prejudice and hatred. “No Quarter” was ever given and “No Quarter” was asked of the regiment’s black soldiers. The contributions of the First Kansas Colored Volunteers, in conjunction with those of the many regiments they served along side of, resulted in a resounding Union victory in the Trans-Mississippi West.

Publication Date:
Jul 03 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
1500393517 / 9781500393519
Page Count:
122
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / United States / Civil War

15.95

Primary Sidebar