Skip to content

Content Header

New CRS Reports

New CRS Reports published on 1 Comment on New CRS Reports

The new Penny Hill Press site is functional but still a work in progress. I am using my last list for the “Daily Report” which will now be sent whenever we post new reports. At the very least you will get a weekly email. If you find the time please add yourself to the list management program via the “Subscribe to Updates” tab.

ID – Title – Publish Date Title Abstract Author
R40152 – U.S. Farm Income Outlook for 2016 – 9/7/2016 U.S. Farm Income Outlook for 2016 According to USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS), national net farm income-a key indicator of U.S. farm well-being-is forecast at $71.5 billion in 2016, down 12% from last year. The 2016 forecast represents the third consecutive year of decline and would be the lowest since 2009 in both nominal and inflation-adjusted dollars. Net farm income is calculated on an accrual basis. Net cash income (calculated on a cash-flow basis) is also projected lower in 2016, down 13% to $94.1 billion. This report is updated to include USDA’s August 30, 2016, farm income update and the August 25, 2016, U.S. agricultural trade outlook update. Randy Schnepf, Specialist in Agricultural Policy
R40957 – Unfunded Mandates Reform Act: History, Impact, and Issues – 9/8/2016 Unfunded Mandates Reform Act: History, Impact, and Issues This report examines debates over what constitutes an unfunded federal mandate and UMRA’s implementation. It focuses on UMRA’s requirement that CBO issue written cost estimate statements for federal mandates in legislation, its procedures for raising points of order in the House and Senate concerning unfunded federal mandates in legislation, and its requirement that federal agencies prepare written cost estimate statements for federal mandates in rules. It also assesses UMRA’s impact on federal mandates and arguments concerning UMRA’s future, focusing on UMRA’s definitions, exclusions, and exceptions that currently exempt many federal actions with potentially significant financial impacts on nonfederal entities. An examination of the rise of unfunded federal mandates as a national issue and a summary of UMRA’s legislative history are provided in Appendix A. Citations to UMRA points of order raised in the House and Senate are provided in Appendix B. Bills: H.R. 50, H.R. 4078, H.R. 899, H.R. 4, S. 189 Robert Jay Dilger, Senior Specialist in American National Government; Richard S. Beth, Specialist on Congress and the Legislative Process
R41330 – National Monuments and the Antiquities Act – 9/7/2016 National Monuments and the Antiquities Act The Antiquities Act was a response to concerns over theft from and destruction of archaeological sites and was designed to provide an expeditious means to protect federal lands and resources. President Theodore Roosevelt used the authority in 1906 to establish Devil’s Tower in Wyoming as the first national monument. Sixteen of the 19 Presidents11 since 1906 created 150 monuments, including the Grand Canyon, Grand Teton, Zion, Olympic, the Statue of Liberty, and the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. President Franklin Roosevelt used his authority the most often (36 times), while President Obama has proclaimed the most monument acreage (about 265 million, primarily in one expanded marine monument). Bills: H.R. 1495, H.R. 1439, H.R. 1434, S. 472, S. 17, H.R. 432, H.R. 1521, H.R. 758, S. 104, H.R. 382, H.R. 1881, H.R. 1459, H.R. 1526, H.R. 2192, H.R. 3895, S. 17 Carol Hardy Vincent, Specialist in Natural Resources Policy; Kristina Alexander, Legislative Attorney
R42723 – Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) and Marine Personnel Carrier (MPC): Background and Issues for Congress – 9/9/2016 Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) and Marine Personnel Carrier (MPC): Background and Issues for Congress On January 6, 2011, after spending approximately $3 billion in developmental funding, the Marine Corps cancelled the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV) program due to poor reliability demonstrated during operational testing and excessive cost growth. Because the EFV was intended to replace the 40-year-old Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAV), the Pentagon pledged to move quickly to develop a "more affordable and sustainable" vehicle to replace the EFV. The Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) is intended to replace the AAV, incorporating some EFV capabilities but in a more practical and cost-efficient manner. In concert with the ACV, the Marines were developing the Marine Personnel Carrier (MPC) to serve as a survivable and mobile platform to transport Marines when ashore. The MPC was not intended to be amphibious like an AAV, EFV, or the ACV but instead would be required to have a swim capability for inland waterways such as rivers, lakes, and other water obstacles such as shore-to-shore operations in the littorals. Both vehicles are intended to play central roles in future Marine amphibious operations. Andrew Feickert, Specialist in Military Ground Forces
R43166 – Democratic Republic of Congo: Background and U.S. Relations – 9/6/2016 Democratic Republic of Congo: Background and U.S. Relations Poor governance, conflict, and a long-running humanitarian crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) present a range of challenges for international policymakers, including Members of Congress. Chronic instability in mineral-rich and densely populated eastern DRC has caused widespread human suffering and inhibited economic development throughout the wider Great Lakes region of central Africa. Congolese political actors have displayed limited capacity and will to improve security and state administration, while neighboring states have periodically provided support to rebel groups in the country. U.S. officials have expressed mounting concern about DRC’s democratic trajectory ahead of national elections notionally slated for 2016. Incumbent President Joseph Kabila, in office since 2001, is constitutionally barred from reelection, but he appears likely to cling to power by delaying the polls. DRC has never experienced an electoral transfer of power between administrations. Election-related tensions have raised concerns about possible violence in a sub-region already experiencing substantial political unrest. Alexis Arieff, Analyst in African Affairs
R43816 – Argentina: Background and U.S. Relations – 9/6/2016 Argentina: Background and U.S. Relations This report provides background on the political and economic situation in Argentina and U.S.-Argentine relations. An Appendix provides links to selected U.S. government reports on Argentina. Bills: H.R. 3049, S.1800 Mark P. Sullivan, Specialist in Latin American Affairs; Rebecca M. Nelson, Specialist in International Trade and Finance
R43869 – Membership of the 114th Congress: A Profile – 9/7/2016 Membership of the 114th Congress: A Profile This report presents a profile of the membership of the 114th Congress (2015-2016). Statistical information is included on selected characteristics of Members, including data on party affiliation, average age, occupation, education, length of congressional service, religious affiliation, gender, ethnicity, foreign births, and military service. The portions of this report covering political party affiliation, gender, ethnicity, and vacant seats will be updated as events warrant. The remainder of the report will not be updated. Jennifer E. Manning, Information Research Specialist
R44008 – Preschool Development Grants (FY2014-FY2016) and Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge Grants (FY2011-FY2013) – 9/7/2016 Preschool Development Grants (FY2014-FY2016) and Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge Grants (FY2011-FY2013) This report focuses on two early childhood initiatives-Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) grants for FY2011-FY2013 and Preschool Development Grants (PDG) for FY2014-FY2016. Both programs have been administered jointly by the U.S. Department of Education (ED) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). In addition to background and information on these programs, the report provides data on states that received grants under one or both of these programs. Bills: H.R. 3221, S. 1177 Kyrie E. Dragoo, Analyst in Education Policy; Gail McCallion, Specialist in Social Policy
R44030 – FY2016 Appropriations: District of Columbia – 9/8/2016 FY2016 Appropriations: District of Columbia On February 2, 2015, the Obama Administration released its budget request for FY2016. The Administration’s proposed budget included $474 million in special federal payments to the District of Columbia government. An additional $286 million was requested for the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency (CSOSA) and the Public Defender Service, two federally chartered, independent agencies that work exclusively on behalf of the District criminal justice system. The combined budget requests totaled $760 million in special federal payments. Eugene Boyd, Analyst in Federalism and Economic Development Policy
R44178 – Patriot Day: Fact Sheet – 9/9/2016 Patriot Day: Fact Sheet In 2001, P.L. 107-89 designated September 11 as Patriot Day to honor the individuals who lost their lives as a result of the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. The law asks the President to issue an annual Proclamation for Patriot Day that directs the U.S. flag be flown at half-staff and a moment of silence be observed. Audrey Celeste Crane-Hirsch, Reference Librarian
R44230 – Immigration Legislation and Issues in the 114th Congress – 9/9/2016 Immigration Legislation and Issues in the 114th Congress Although immigration has not been a front-burner issue in the 114th Congress, the House and the Senate have passed several immigration-related measures. Among them are the Border Jobs for Veterans Act of 2015 (P.L. 114-68) on border security personnel, the Adoptive Family Relief Act (P.L. 114-70) on inter-country adoption, and the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (P.L. 114-92) on the Afghan special immigrant visa program. The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016 (P.L. 114-113) extends four immigration programs (EB-5 immigrant investor Regional Center Pilot Program, E-Verify employment eligibility verification system, Conrad State program for foreign medical graduates, and special immigrant religious worker program) through September 30, 2016,1 and contains provisions on the Visa Waiver Program (VWP) and certain nonimmigrant visa programs. Bills: H.R. 455, H.R. 998, H.R. 1634, H.R. 3009, H.R. 4038, H.R. 399, H.R. 3583, H.R. 3586, H.R. 1147, S. 750, S. 1808, S. 1864, S. 1873, S. 1635 Andorra Bruno, Coordinator Specialist in Immigration Policy; Carla N. Argueta, Analyst in Immigration Policy
R44312 – Ocean Energy Agency Appropriations, FY2017 – 9/8/2016 Ocean Energy Agency Appropriations, FY2017 This report discusses FY2017 appropriations for the Department of the Interior’s (DOI’s) Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE), and Office of Natural Resources Revenue (ONRR)-the three agencies that collectively administer federal ocean energy resources covering more than 1.7 billion acres on the U.S. outer continental shelf (OCS). These agencies were established in a departmental reorganization following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill of April 2010; prior to the spill, the nation’s OCS energy resources were administered by DOI’s Minerals Management Service. Under the reorganization, BOEM administers offshore energy leasing, BSEE oversees offshore operational safety and environmental responsibility, and ONRR manages public revenues from federally regulated offshore and onshore energy projects. BOEM, BSEE, and ONRR receive appropriations in the annual Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies appropriations bill. Bills: H.R. 5538, S. 3068 Laura B. Comay, Analyst in Natural Resources Policy
R44397 – NASA: FY2017 Budget and Appropriations – 9/6/2016 NASA: FY2017 Budget and Appropriations The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was created in 1958 by the National Aeronautics and Space Act (P.L. 85-568) to conduct civilian space and aeronautics activities. It has four mission directorates. The Science Mission Directorate manages robotic science missions, such as the Hubble Space Telescope, the Mars rover Curiosity, and satellites for Earth science research. The Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate conducts research and development on aircraft and aviation systems. The Space Technology Mission Directorate develops new technologies for use in future space missions, such as advanced propulsion and laser communications. The Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate is responsible for human spaceflight activities, including the International Space Station and development efforts for future crewed spacecraft. In addition, NASA’s Office of Education manages formal and informal education programs for school children, college and university students, and the general public. Bills: H.R. 2029 Daniel Morgan, Specialist in Science and Technology Policy
R44533 – Qatar: Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy – 9/7/2016 Qatar: Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy The state of Qatar, a member of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC: Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, and Oman), has employed its ample financial resources to try to "punch above its weight" on regional and international affairs. Qatar has intervened, directly and indirectly, in several regional conflicts-sometimes in partnership with the United States and sometimes as part of a separate initiative of like-minded GCC states. It has also sought to establish itself as an indispensable interlocutor on some issues, such as those involving the Palestinian Islamist organization Hamas and the Taliban insurgent group in Afghanistan. Kenneth Katzman, Specialist in Middle Eastern Affairs
R44547 – Digital Searches and Seizures: Overview of Proposed Amendments to Rule 41 – 9/8/2016 Digital Searches and Seizures: Overview of Proposed Amendments to Rule 41 This report provides a brief overview of the proposed amendment to Rule 41. First, it provides a background on the origin of, and rationale underlying, the proposed amendment and a description of the rule as currently written. Second, it reviews the potential changes made by the proposed amendment and will survey various concerns commenters have raised with the proposal. Lastly, this report addresses efforts being made in Congress to alter, delay, or stop this rule change. Bills: H.R. 5321, S. 2952 Richard M. Thompson II, Legislative Attorney
R44614 – Marketplace Lending: Fintech in Consumer and Small-Business Lending – 9/6/2016 Marketplace Lending: Fintech in Consumer and Small-Business Lending This report begins by providing an overview of the marketplace-lending industry. The report then analyzes the potential benefits and risks the industry creates. Next, it describes existing regulation relevant to marketplace lending before examining some regulatory issues surrounding the industry. The report concludes with an examination of possible future developments. David W. Perkins, Analyst in Macroeconomic Policy
R44615 – EPA’s Recent Methane Regulations: Legal Overview – 9/6/2016 EPA’s Recent Methane Regulations: Legal Overview President Obama’s "Climate Action Plan" aims to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases (GHGs). One of the initiatives within the Plan focuses on the control of emissions of methane, a short-lived climate pollutant. In 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other federal agencies developed an interagency "Strategy to Reduce Methane Emissions" (Methane Strategy) that outlined voluntary actions and potential agency rulemakings to cut methane emissions. Linda Tsang, Legislative Attorney
R44616 – FATCA Reporting on U.S. Accounts: Recent Legal Developments – 9/7/2016 FATCA Reporting on U.S. Accounts: Recent Legal Developments This report provides an overview of the FFI reporting requirements and examines the role of the intergovernmental agreements (IGAs) in implementing them. The report then discusses the confidentiality protections provided to the information reported by FFIs and litigation in which plaintiffs have raised concerns about privacy and the use of IGAs. It ends with a summary of FATCA legislation introduced in the 114th Congress. For further discussion of FATCA, as well as the related requirements known as Foreign Bank Account Reporting (FBAR), see CRS Report R43444, Reporting Foreign Financial Assets Under Titles 26 and 31: FATCA and FBAR. Bills: H.R. 297, H.R. 3078, S. 104 Erika K. Lunder, Legislative Attorney
R44617 – Corporate Inversions: Frequently Asked Legal Questions – 9/7/2016 Corporate Inversions: Frequently Asked Legal Questions This report only examines the federal tax consequences of corporate inversions. For a discussion of the federal contracting implications, see CRS Report R43780, Contracting with Inverted Domestic Corporations: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions, by Kate M. Manuel and Erika K. Lunder. For a discussion of the policy issues surrounding inversions, see CRS Report R43568, Corporate Expatriation, Inversions, and Mergers: Tax Issues, by Donald J. Marples and Jane G. Gravelle. Bills: H.R. 1790, H.R. 1790, H.R. 297, H.R. 5106, H.R. 3064, H.R. 415, H.R. 4581, H.R. 5125, S. 922, S. 174, S. 2677, S. 198 Erika K. Lunder, Legislative Attorney
R44618 – Post-Heller Second Amendment Jurisprudence – 9/7/2016 Post-Heller Second Amendment Jurisprudence This report examines the scope of the Second Amendment, as interpreted by the federal circuit courts of appeals, after the watershed Supreme Court decisions in District of Columbia v. Heller and McDonald v. City of Chicago. The Second Amendment states that "[a] well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed." Before the Supreme Court’s 2008 opinion in Heller, the Second Amendment had received little Supreme Court attention and had been largely interpreted, at least by the lower federal courts, to be intertwined with military or militia use. Still, there had been ample debate in the lower federal courts and political discussion over whether the Second Amendment provides an individual right to keep and bear arms, versus a collective right belonging to the states to maintain militias, with the vast majority of the lower federal courts embracing the collective right theory. Sarah S. Herman, Legislative Attorney
R44620 – Biologics and Biosimilars: Background and Key Issues – 9/7/2016 Biologics and Biosimilars: Background and Key Issues A biological product, or biologic, is a preparation, such as a drug or a vaccine, that is made from living organisms. Compared with conventional chemical drugs, biologics are relatively large and complex molecules. They may be composed of proteins (and/or their constituent amino acids), carbohydrates (such as sugars), nucleic acids (such as DNA), or combinations of these substances. Biologics may also be cells or tissues used in transplantation. A biosimilar, sometimes referred to as a follow-on biologic, is a therapeutic drug that is similar but not structurally identical to the brand-name biologic made by a pharmaceutical or biotechnology company. In contrast to the relatively simple structure and manufacture of chemical drugs, biosimilars, with their more complex nature and method of manufacture, will not be identical to the brand-name product, but may instead be shown to be highly similar. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates both biologics and chemical drugs. Judith A. Johnson, Specialist in Biomedical Policy
R44621 – Department of Homeland Security Appropriations: FY2017 – 9/7/2016 Department of Homeland Security Appropriations: FY2017 This report discusses the FY2017 appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The report makes note of many budgetary resources provided to DHS, but its primary focus is on funding approved by Congress through the appropriations process. It includes an Appendix with definitions of key budget terms used throughout the suite of Congressional Research Service reports on homeland security appropriations. It also directs the reader to other reports providing context for and additional details regarding specific component appropriations and issues engaged through the FY2016 appropriations process. Bills: H.R. 5634, H.R. 3128, H.R. 240, H.R. 2090, S. 3001 William L. Painter – Coordinator, Analyst in Emergency Management and Homeland Security Policy
R44622 – Patent Cases in the October 2015 Term of the U.S. Supreme Court: Halo Electronics v. Pulse Electronics and Cuozzo Speed Technologies v. Lee – 9/7/2016 Patent Cases in the October 2015 Term of the U.S. Supreme Court: Halo Electronics v. Pulse Electronics and Cuozzo Speed Technologies v. Lee This report examines the two patent law cases decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in its October 2015 Term. The first patent case, decided on June 13, 2016, Halo Electronics, Inc. v. Pulse Electronics, Inc., concerns the circumstances in which the awarding of enhanced damages in a patent infringement case are warranted and the discretion of the district courts to award them. Section 284 of the Patent Act provides that the court may increase damages up to three times the amount found by a jury or assessed by the court, but does not provide any guidance to the court, or any express limits or conditions, in how to exercise its discretion to do so. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (Federal Circuit), a specialized tribunal established by Congress that has exclusive appellate jurisdiction in patent cases, limited such awards to cases of "willful infringement." Specifically, in its 2007 opinion, In re Seagate Technology, the Federal Circuit established a two-part test that must be met before the district court can exercise its discretion to increase damages under Section 284. This strict standard arguably made such awards very difficult for patent holders to recover. In a unanimous opinion, the Halo Supreme Court rejected the Seagate test for enhanced damages, determining that it was unduly rigid and inconsistent with the statutory grant of discretion to courts to decide when to award punitive damages. In invalidating the strict Seagate test, the Halo opinion advised district courts to exercise their discretion to award enhanced damages in a manner consistent with Supreme Court precedent that generally reserves such punishment for "egregious cases of misconduct beyond typical infringement." Bills: H.R. 2578, H.R. 9 Brian T. Yeh, Legislative Attorney
R44623 – Commemorative Coins: Background, Legislative Process, and Issues for Congress – 9/7/2016 Commemorative Coins: Background, Legislative Process, and Issues for Congress This report examines the origins, development, and current practices for commemorative coins, including the authorization process; the design of coins; and issues for congressional consideration, including the disbursement of surcharges, the number of coins minted per year, differences between the number of authorized coins and coins sold, and requirements for legislative consideration in the House and Senate. Bills: H.R. 2978, H.R. 2906, H.R. 358, H.R. 1683, H.R. 5168, H.R. 2726, H.R. 602, H.R. 4592, H.R. 2980, H.R. 5598, H.R. 893, H.R. 2722, S. 2474, S. 2266, S. 985, S.2890 Jacob R. Straus, Analyst on the Congress
R44624 – The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Funding: A Primer – 9/7/2016 The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Funding: A Primer This report will examine the development of the allocation formula for the Part B grants-to-states program, the major changes to the formula over the past 40 years, current funding levels and trends, and how allocations are currently calculated. Issues concerning the funding of special education and related services will also be discussed. Bills: H.R. 514, H.R. 15727, H.R. 70 Kyrie E. Dragoo, Analyst in Education Policy
R44625 – Department of Veterans Affairs FY2017 Appropriations – 9/8/2016 Department of Veterans Affairs FY2017 Appropriations The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) provides a range of benefits and services to veterans and eligible dependents who meet certain criteria as authorized by law. These benefits include medical care, disability compensation and pensions, education, vocational rehabilitation and employment services, assistance to homeless veterans, home loan guarantees, administration of life insurance as well as traumatic injury protection insurance for servicemembers, and death benefits that cover burial expenses. Sidath Viranga Panangala, Specialist in Veterans Policy
R44626 – The Advocacy of Terrorism on the Internet: Freedom of Speech Issues and the Material Support Statutes – 9/8/2016 The Advocacy of Terrorism on the Internet: Freedom of Speech Issues and the Material Support Statutes The development of the Internet has revolutionized communications. It has never been easier to speak to wide audiences or to communicate with people that may be located more than half a world away from the speaker. However, like any neutral platform, the Internet can be used to many different ends, including illegal, offensive, or dangerous purposes. Terrorist groups, such as the Islamic State (IS, also referred to as ISIS or ISIL), Al Qaeda, Hamas, and Al Shabaab, use the Internet to disseminate their ideology, to recruit new members, and to take credit for attacks around the world. In addition, some people who are not members of these groups may view this content and could begin to sympathize with or to adhere to the violent philosophies these groups advocate. They might even act on these beliefs. Kathleen Ann Ruane, Legislative Attorney
R44627 – Interior Immigration Enforcement: Criminal Alien Programs – 9/8/2016 Interior Immigration Enforcement: Criminal Alien Programs This report begins by defining the criminal alien population and quantifying a portion of it with the limited publically available data. Next it presents the most recent ICE enforcement priorities that emerged with the introduction of PEP in November 2014. The report then describes the major ICE immigration enforcement programs that target criminal aliens. The final section discusses selected policy considerations for programs targeting criminal aliens. This includes a discussion of current levels of enforcement and program appropriations, as well as state and local involvement in immigration enforcement. Bills: H.R. 6947, H.R. 2764, H.R. 2017 William A. Kandel, Analyst in Immigration Policy
R44628 – Election and Voting Law: Resources for Congressional Staff – 9/9/2016 Election and Voting Law: Resources for Congressional Staff This report is intended to serve as a starting point for congressional staff covering voting and elections. It focuses on resources related to laws governing federal elections and voting. It outlines and describes some of the key sources of laws, pending legislation, regulations, cases, the Congressional Research Service (CRS) products, and federal agencies working in this subject area. This report also contains sections dedicated to the voting process, voting rights, campaign finance, and presidential elections. Elizabeth A. Schiller, Law Librarian
R44629 – Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDCs): Background and Issues for Congress – 9/6/2016 Federally Funded Research and Development Centers (FFRDCs): Background and Issues for Congress The federal government supports research and development (R&D) that is conducted by a wide variety of performers, including federally owned and operated laboratories, universities, private companies, and other research institutions. A special class of research institutions referred to as federally funded research and development centers, or FFRDCs, are owned by the federal government, but operated by contractors, including universities, other non-profit organizations, and industrial firms. FFRDCs are intended to provide federal agencies with R&D capabilities that cannot be effectively met by the federal government or the private sector alone. FFRDCs are required to have a long-term strategic relationship with the federal agency that supports them. This relationship is presumed to convey a number of benefits, including the ability of an FFRDC to recruit and retain scientific and technical expertise; an in-depth knowledge of, and the capability to rapidly respond to, the R&D needs of the federal agency; and the capacity to offer independent and objective scientific and technical advice. Currently, 12 federal agencies sponsor a total of 42 FFRDCs. These FFRDCs provide R&D capabilities in support of federal agency missions in a broad range of areas-from energy and cybersecurity to cancer and astronomy. In FY2014, the federal government spent $10.6 billion or 8.1% of its total R&D expenditures at FFRDCs. Marcy E. Gallo, Analyst in Science and Technology Policy
RL31654 – The Endangered Species Act: A Primer – 9/8/2016 The Endangered Species Act: A Primer The Endangered Species Act (ESA; P.L. 93-205, 87 Stat. 884. 16 U.S.C. ??1531-1544) frequently receives significant congressional attention. It offers comprehensive protection for species identified as endangered or threatened with extinction. Over the years, the power of this protection has ignited calls for greater bounds on this power, as well as assertions of its lax implementation. The following discussion provides an overview and background on the various features of the ESA that contribute to its legal stature and yet spark an ongoing debate over its implementation. Bills: H.R. 578, H.R. 2996 M. Lynne Corn and Eugene H. Buck, Specialists in Natural Resources Policy; Kristina Alexander, Legislative Attorney
RL33531 – Land and Water Conservation Fund: Overview, Funding History, and Issues – 9/6/2016 Land and Water Conservation Fund: Overview, Funding History, and Issues The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) Act of 1965 was enacted to help preserve, develop, and ensure access to outdoor recreation resources. A main goal of the law was to facilitate participation in recreation and strengthen the "health and vitality" of U.S. citizens. The law sought to accomplish this goal by "providing funds" for federal land acquisition and for federal assistance to states in recreation planning, acquisition of lands and waters, and development of recreation facilities. Bills: H.R. 1814, H.R. 4151, H.R. 1814, H.R. 3173, H.R. 201, H.R. 3977, H.R. 2584, S. 338, S. 890, S. 556, S. 390, S. 2012 Carol Hardy Vincent, Specialist in Natural Resources Policy
RS21165 – House Standing Committee Chairs and Ranking Minority Members: Rules Governing Selection Procedures – 9/8/2016 House Standing Committee Chairs and Ranking Minority Members: Rules Governing Selection Procedures House Rule X, clause 5(c)(2), adopted in 1995 limited committee (and subcommittee) chairs to three terms of consecutive service. Service for less than a full session in a Congress is disregarded. A rules change adopted on January 7, 2003, pursuant to H.Res. 5, exempted the Intelligence Committee chair from the limit. A rules change adopted on January 4, 2005, pursuant to H.Res. 5, exempted the Rules Committee chair from the limit. In 2009, the Democratic majority removed term limits from House rules. The rules adopted on January 3, 2013, reinstituted term limits for all committee chairs, but continued the exemption for the Rules Committee chair. Judy Schneider, Specialist on the Congress
RS22942 – Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV): Background and Issues for Congress – 9/9/2016 Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV): Background and Issues for Congress The Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) is being developed by the Army and the Marine Corps as a successor to the High Mobility, Multi-Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV), which has been in service since 1985. On October 28, 2008, awards were made for the JLTV Technology Development (TD) Phase to three industry teams: (1) BAE Systems, (2) the team of Lockheed Martin and General Tactical Vehicle, and (3) AM General and General Dynamics Land Systems. On January 26, 2012, the Army issued the Request for Proposal (RFP) for the JLTV’s EMD phase. Up to three EMD contracts could be awarded, and contract award was scheduled for June 2012. The period of performance for EMD contracts is 27 months, with the overall EMD phase scheduled to last 33 months. Vendors would be required to provide 22 JLTV prototypes for testing 12 months after contract award. The target cost for the base vehicle is $250,000 excluding add-on armor and other kits. On August 22, 2012, the Army announced the award of three firm-fixed price JLTV EMD contracts totaling approximately $185 million. The three companies awarded the EMD contracts were AM General, LLC (South Bend, IN); Lockheed Martin Corporation (Grand Prairie, TX); and Oshkosh Corporation (Oshkosh, WI). Andrew Feickert, Specialist in Military Ground Forces

1 Comment

This is where I have hidden the place you give me negative/positive comments. Trust me I value the negatives more than the positives. Leave them here and I will publicly respond… well unless you are off topic and looking for shock responses from our list of “friendlies”

Leave a Reply

Primary Sidebar