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An Operational Level Analysis of Soviet Armored Formations in the Deliberate Defense in the Battle of Kursk, 1943

An Operational Level Analysis of Soviet Armored Formations in the Deliberate Defense in the Battle of Kursk, 1943 published on

 

Authored by U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

‘This study is an historical analysis of the Soviet operational use of tank and mechanized corps, and tank armies, in the deliberate defense
at the Battle of Kursk in 1943. It centers on the question of how effective was the Red Army in employing these’ units during this momentous battle. Events that shaped the battle and a brief comparison of forces set the stage. A discussion of the actual battle on the Central and Voronezh Fronts is followed by an analysis of the effectiveness of the employment of the operational armored units.

The battle analysis methodology as promulgated by the Combat Studies Institute at the United States Army Command and General Staff College,
Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, established the guidelines for the study.

Both Western and Soviet sources were utilized. Objectivity and compatability of all available source material were of paramount importance in establishing the validity and accuracy of various
accounts.

The study concludes the Soviets prepared superbly for the operational battle; however, execution fell short of expectations. Because this was the first time the Soviets used tank armies in battle, an analysis of Kursk serves as an excellent catalyst for subsequent examination of present Soviet defensive doctrine and the use of tank armies in defense.

Publication Date:
Apr 15 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
151173390X / 9781511733908
Page Count:
126
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / Military / World War II

12.95

Defending Hitler’s Reich: German Ground-Based Air Defenses, 1914-1945

Defending Hitler’s Reich: German Ground-Based Air Defenses, 1914-1945 published on

Authored by The Department of the Air Force

Based on the experience gained in World War I and the technological and organizational developments of anti-aircraft forces in the interwar period, Germany’s political and military leadership entered the Second World War with high expectations for the Luftwaffe’s ground-based air defenses. These expectations were tied to a standard that measured success based simply on the number of aircraft shot down. Despite the success enjoyed by the Luftwaffe’s flak defenses between 1939 and 1945, many Luftwaffe leaders demonstrated a limited understanding of the broader outlines and effectiveness of Germany’s ground-based air defenses. These men repeatedly were guilty of evaluating the performance of the Luftwaffe’s air defenses using a simple binomial equation that compared flak with fighter performance. This myopic focus on fighters versus flak led the Luftwaffe’s leadership consistently to ignore or grossly underestimate the contributions of other elements of the ground-based air defense network. German flak defenses accounted for at least half of American aircraft combat losses during the war and an estimated thirty-seven percent of Bomber Command’s missing aircraft during night raids, while anti-aircraft fire damaged more than 66,000 U.S. bombers and over 9,000 British bombers. Anti-aircraft defenses not only destroyed and damaged aircraft, they also severely degraded bombing accuracy by driving bombers to higher altitudes and inducing evasive maneuvering on the final bomb run. Flak damage also crippled Allied aircraft making them easy prey for Luftwaffe fighters. However, Luftwaffe leaders largely ignored these “hidden” effects by focusing solely on the number of aircraft destroyed. Likewise, they often failed to recognize the outstanding returns achieved by decoy and deception measures at relatively low cost, despite the large number of Allied bombs that fell on these sites. Another example involved the critical support provided by searchlights to night fighter forces at different stages of the conflict, as well as the contributions made by smoke generators and barrage balloons to point defenses. In the end, the Luftwaffe’s ground-based air defenses provided a capable and effective adjunct to the Third Reich’s fighter defenses; a contribution largely ignored or underestimated by both contemporary Luftwaffe leaders and post-war historians of the air war.

Publication Date:
Apr 15 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1511733977 / 9781511733977
Page Count:
570
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / Military / World War II

24.94

The Marshall Plan: Rebuilding Europe

The Marshall Plan: Rebuilding Europe published on

Authored by United States Government

On June 5, 1947, speaking to the graduating class at Harvard University, Secretary of State George C. Marshall laid the foundation, in the aftermath of World War II, for a U.S. program of assistance to the countries of Europe. At a time when great cities lay in ruins and national economies were devastated, Marshall called on America to “do whatever it is able to do to assist
in the return of normal economic health in the world, without which there can be no political stability and no assured peace.”

The U.S. Congress approved Marshall’s long-sighted proposal in 1948, and by 1952 the United States had channeled some $13 billion in economic aid and technical assistance to 16 European countries. During the program’s four years, participating countries saw their aggregate gross national product rise more than 30 percent and industrial production increase by 40 percent over prewar levels.

But the Marshall Plan, as it came to be known, was not just an American program. It was a joint European-American venture, one in which American resources were complemented with local resources, one in which the participants worked cooperatively toward the common goals of freedom and prosperity.
Many have been generous in their praise of the Marshall Plan, but perhaps none more than Sir Winston Churchill, to whom it represented “the most unsordid act in history.”

Publication Date:
Mar 13 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1508844860 / 9781508844860
Page Count:
24
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / Military / World War II

12.95

The Battle of Attu and the Aleutian Island Campaign

The Battle of Attu and the Aleutian Island Campaign published on

Authored by U.S. Army Command and General Staff College
The Battle of Attu is a case study for the importance of the proper application of operational art into the planning and preparation of a major military operation. This monograph provides a succinct historical account of the events surrounding the Battle of Attu and the Aleutian Island Campaign in order to provide the strategic and operational context that shaped the American operational approach. Analysis of primary source data used includes personal accounts, media sources, and previous studies. America was successful due to its ability to organize and apply combat power by leveraging the elements of operational art; specifically, the elements of operational reach and basing. These elements led to the building of depth during the Battle of Attu which was critical to the successful outcome of the battle.

Publication Date:
Apr 07 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1511615338 / 9781511615334
Page Count:
46
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / Military / World War II

12.95

OSS Training and Service Abroad in World War II

OSS Training and Service Abroad in World War II published on

Authored by U.S. National Park Service

Because of the secrecy that enveloped the U.S. Office of Strategic Services in World War II, it surprises most people, including nearby residents, to learn that spies were trained in some of the National Parks-not just spies but guerrilla leaders, saboteurs, clandestine radio operators and others who would be infiltrated behind enemy lines. What are today known as Catoctin Mountain Park in Maryland and Prince William Forest Park in Virginia played a vital role in the training of the operatives of the U.S. Office of Strategic Services. Known by its initials, the OSS was a specially created wartime military agency that fought a largely invisible and covert war against the Axis powers between 1942 and 1945. America’s first national centralized intelligence agency with thousands of clandestine operatives, spies, and intelligence analysts, the OSS is acknowledged as the predecessor of the Central Intelligence Agency. With its Special Operations troops and Operational Group commandos, the OSS is also widely considered a forerunner of today’s Special Forces.
From 1941 to 1945, the men and women of the OSS were part of a “shadow war,” a war largely behind the scenes and often behind enemy lines around the world. Highly secret during the war and in many instances for years thereafter, that effort was designed to help undermine the conquests of Nazi Germany, fascist Italy, and militaristic Japan. The “shadow warriors” sought to supply and guide local resistance movements, demoralize the enemy through “black propaganda,” and to gather intelligence and commit sabotage in enemy occupied territory to contribute to the victory of the Allies’ armed forces as they overcame the totalitarian, Axis aggressors.

Publication Date:
Apr 10 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1511654767 / 9781511654760
Page Count:
640
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
7″ x 10″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / Military / World War II

24.95

Triumph in the Philippines

Triumph in the Philippines published on

Authored by Center of Military History United States Army

The reconquest of the Philippine archipelago (exclusive of Leyte), with detailed accounts of Sixth Army and Eighth Army operations on Luzon, as well as of the Eighth Army’s reoccupation of the southern Philippines.

Publication Date:
Feb 25 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1508619476 / 9781508619475
Page Count:
680
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
7″ x 10″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / Military / World War II

24.95

Operation Thursday: Birth of the Air Commandos

Operation Thursday: Birth of the Air Commandos published on

Authored by Office of Air Force History, U.S. Air Force

A bold, unconventional use of American air power to support British ground troops in Burma, Operation THURSDAY marked a critical development in the history of modern warfare. On March 5-6, 1944, the Allies conducted an air invasion of Burma, in an attempt to push back the Japanese in the China-Burma-India Theater and reestablish the land route between India and China. U.S. airmen formed a special operations unit-the 1st Air Commando Group–to transport troops to jungle locations and resupply them, often in the line of fire. The remarkable success of this operation lives on, fifty years later, among the elite 1st Air Commando Group–a force committed to meeting the challenge of unconventional warfare any time, any place, anywhere.

Publication Date:
Feb 26 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1508644330 / 9781508644330
Page Count:
50
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
7″ x 10″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / Military / World War II

14.95

Utah Beach to Cherbourg 6-27 June 1944

Utah Beach to Cherbourg 6-27 June 1944 published on

Authored by Center of Military History United States Army

A companion volume to Omaha Beachhead, this narrative rounds out the account of the landings at corps level and below and relates the course of VII Corps combat operations which resulted in the capture of Cherbourg on 27 June 1944.

Publication Date:
Feb 27 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1508649235 / 9781508649236
Page Count:
222
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / Military / World War II

14.95

The Strategic Air War Against Germany and Japan: A Memoir

The Strategic Air War Against Germany and Japan: A Memoir published on

Authored by Office of Air Force History, U.S. Air Force, Gen. Haywood S. Hansell Jr

This book seeks to recount the air experience and development before World War II, to describe the objectives, plans and effects of strategic air warfare in Europe and in the Pacific, and to offer criticism, opinion, and lessons of that great conflict. In retrospect I find that I have been singularly fortunate in my associations and assignments. I have been associated with many great men and have been in position to observe great events. In the decade before World War II, I had a priceless opportunity to work with Bob Olds, Harold Lee George, Ken Walker, Don Wilson, and Muir “Santy” Fairchild, under the guidance, inspiration, and benign protection of the Commandant of the Air Corps Tactical School at Maxwell Field, Col. John F. Curry. My associates also included Ira C. Eaker, who combined great ability as a staff executive with superlative leadership as Commanding General of the Eighth Air Force in England. I worked under that superb airman, Carl “Tooey” Spaatz, Commanding General, United States Strategic Air Forces in Europe. I was caught up in the dedication and driving spirit of Henry H. “Hap” Arnold, Commanding General, U.S. Army Air Forces, Air Member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Commanding General, Twentieth Air Force. And I had the special privilege of working for the greatest soldier of our day, and perhaps of any day, a man of superb integrity and highest character: Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Catlett Marshall. The observations contained in this book constitute a memoir, with all the shortcomings of faulty memory, bias, personal viewpoint, personal experience, and inadequate research that are implied in the term. They lead to speculation on probable results of alternative actions or conditions, and that speculation is likewise suspect because it reflects personal judgment. But the compendium may lead others to derive lessons and conclusions which fit into a broader mosaic.

Publication Date:
Mar 01 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1508675503 / 9781508675501
Page Count:
322
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
7″ x 10″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / Military / World War II

19.95

Medical Support of the Army Air Forces in World War II (Part 1 of 2)

Medical Support of the Army Air Forces in World War II (Part 1 of 2) published on

Authored by Office of Air Force History, U.S. Air Force

PART 1 of 2
Medical Support of the Army Air Forces In World War II has been prepared to fill a gap in the medical history of that period. Its purpose is to present a unified narrative of the total performance of the AAF medical service in support of the Air Forces combat mission. Fundamentally a reference book, this volume is based almost exclusively upon unpublished documents in custody of the U. S. Air Force, with occasional citation of published sources.
Since this volume, like other comparable military publications in World War II, is based upon masses of archival material, the project has been in a very true sense a group project. During World War II professionally trained historians carried out basic research and writing while professional specialists in aviation medicine prepared highly
technical materials. And while as authors we must assume final responsibility for the historical and technical accuracy of the presentation and interpretation of the present volume, it has been our intention insofar as is humanly possible to establish and acknowledge individual contributions. In the order of sequence in which these group efforts appear, first mention is made of Chapter Ill, “School of Aviation and Related Programs” which represents a collation of edited data based upon the series of 6-month histories prepared in the Army Air Forces Training Command under the direction of Col. Neeley Mashburn (MC), by the School of Aviation Medicine, and by the four continental air forces. Chapter IV, “Research and Development” represents in part a collation of materials from the same source, together with a draft prepared by the staff of the Aero Medical Laboratory. Chapter V, “The Air Evacuation Mission” is a collation of data gathered from the histories of the School of Air Evacuation, the School of Aviation Medicine, and the Wing histories of the Air Transport Command. None of these chapters represents original research or writing on the part of the editors. The overseas theaters, on the other hand, have been approached somewhat differently. Two historians on the wartime staff were originally scheduled to prepare monographs on the Mediterranean and European Theaters respectively. John S. G. Carson, Ph. D., who was to prepare the final draft of the AAF/Mediterranean
Theater medical history was called back to his academic post before his research and writing was completed. Chapter VI, however, incorporates much of his draft material. It also includes, with
minor editing, a section on the North African Landings and early Twelfth Air Force prepared in the theater under the direction of Col. William Cook (MC). Another Headquarters historian, Wiley Hodges, Ph.D., was scheduled to prepare a monograph on the European Theater but he too was called back to his academic post before his task was completed. A large section of Chapter VIII dealing with the “Special Problems of Aviation Medicine in Europe”, however, remains substantially as written by him. The section on the Ninth Air Force, with slight editing, incorporates the periodic histories prepared in the theater. And while the editors have taken extensive liberties with his manuscript, authorship credit for the chapter on the Pacific and Southwest Pacific belongs to Lt. Col. Charles G. Mixter, Jr. (MC)
who was Malaria Control Officer in that area during the war and later called to Headquarters, AAF, to prepare the official report. Finally to Bruce Berman, M. A., who is presently a member of the historical staff, goes collaborative credit in preparation of the chapter on ChinaBurma- India. This is in addition to his assistance in editing the
volume.

Publication Date:
Mar 03 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1508686289 / 9781508686286
Page Count:
440
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
7″ x 10″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / Military / World War II

16.95

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