Skip to content

Content Header

The American Defense of Long Island

The American Defense of Long Island published on

Authored by Steven Gunther LCDR

The Continental Congress and General Washington mistakenly inflated the importance of New York City to the cause of the revolution. After racing to beat the British to New York, Washington committed his army to the defense of Long Island, either overlooking or neglecting its critical vulnerabilities. Hopeful of a victory in the fashion of Bunker Hill that could bring an end to the war, Washington and his inexperienced corps of generals led an under-trained, under-equipped, undisciplined force’ into the largest battle of the Revolutionary War against one of the most experienced armies of its time. The subsequent battle was the most lopsided defeat the Continental army suffered during the war and the destruction of the army was prevented only by a daring retreat across the East River.

George Washington decided to defend New York City base on potential political ramifications over military strategy. In doing so, he violated what Clausewitz deemed the supreme act of judgment that a political and military leader must make. Specifically, he failed to determine the kind of war on which they are embarking and not mistake it for, or try to make it something different. Chasing the specter of a decisive victory Washington committed his unprepared forces to an unnecessary task. The resulting defeat set the tone for the rest of 1776 and forced strategic redirection that would ultimately lead to victory.

Publication Date:
Apr 15 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
151173504X / 9781511735049
Page Count:
32
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / United States / Revolutionary War

12.95

Supplying Washington’s Army

Supplying Washington’s Army published on

Authored by Center of Military History United States Army

A study of developments and operations in the Quartermaster’s, Ordnance, Clothing, and Hospital Departments and the Commissariat, illustrating how the Continental Army was maintained in the field.

Publication Date:
Feb 11 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1508436789 / 9781508436782
Page Count:
484
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
7″ x 10″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / United States / Revolutionary War

19.95

March to Victory: Washington, Rochambeau, and the Yorktown Campaign of 1781

March to Victory: Washington, Rochambeau, and the Yorktown Campaign of 1781 published on

Authored by U.S. Army Center of Military History

This pamphlet provides an in-depth account of the most decisive operation of the American Revolution, examining how the Americans and French moved land and naval forces from Rhode Island to Virginia, where they gained the tactical advantage over their opponents at Yorktown. Although the allied forces quickly surrounded the British army on their arrival at Yorktown, the ensuing siege would not have been as successful if the march from Rhode Island to Virginia had not gone as planned. The movement to Yorktown was complex because it had a combined (French and American) as well as joint (land and naval) aspect. French and American military commanders had to overcome formidable barriers of culture, language, tactical doctrine (American and French forces operated under different sets of war-fighting rules), and national political agendas. No one forgot that a mere fifteen years before Yorktown, the American colonists had seen the French and their American Indian allies as implacable enemies.

This work conveys not only how allied commanders overcame these formidable obstacles, but also shows how the march itself solidified American communities along the route and paved the way for a decisive victory at Yorktown and, ultimately, the creation of an independent American republic.

Publication Date:
Jan 23 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1507683219 / 9781507683217
Page Count:
50
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
6″ x 9″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / United States / Revolutionary War

12.95

Presbyterian Patriots: The Historical Context of the Shared History and Prevalent Ideologies of Delaware’s Ulster-Scots who took up arms in the American Revolution

Presbyterian Patriots: The Historical Context of the Shared History and Prevalent Ideologies of Delaware’s Ulster-Scots who took up arms in the American Revolution published on

Authored by United States Army Command and General Staff College

This book examines the phenomenon of the disproportionate volunteerism of members of Delaware’s Presbyterian Ulster-Scot community in the sole Regiment from Delaware to join the Continental Army. It posits Ulster-Scots represented a majority of the officer corps in Continental Regiment for two main reasons: shared cultural history of tyranny by the British, and an ideology that supported the concept of rebellion. This ideology was formed through the two main philosophies: republicanism and liberalism. Both of these ideologies supported and justified rebelling in philosophical terms, and supported their cultural antagonism to the British. This book asserts that the members of the Regiment came to know republican and liberal ideological perspectives as a result of two related venues: universities and churches. As members of Presbyterian congregations, the members of the Continental Regiment would have been exposed to, understood, and internalized the main concepts of republicanism and liberalism. These two aspects add context to the Regiment’s motivation to fight, and provide lessons for modern military planners concerning combat planning and post-conflict governance by offering an example of the fidelity required for “cultural understanding” of opposing forces.

Publication Date:
Jan 15 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1507564937 / 9781507564936
Page Count:
54
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / United States / Revolutionary War

12.95

The American Revolutionary War: The Southern Campaigns

The American Revolutionary War: The Southern Campaigns published on

Authored by Matthew Forney Steele
Edited by Walter H.T. Seager

The American Revolutionary War: The Southern Campaigns is a comprehensive review of the southern American Revolutionary War battles. It was written by then Major Matthew Forney Steele, Second United States Cavalry in 1909 and issued by the War Department.

Publication Date:
Oct 17 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
1502867443 / 9781502867445
Page Count:
26
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
6″ x 9″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / United States / Revolutionary War

9.95

Understanding British Strategic Failure in America: 1780-1783

Understanding British Strategic Failure in America: 1780-1783 published on

Authored by U.S. Army War College

The War for American Independence was a complex, unconventional, and violent political struggle for the loyalty and allegiance of the American population writ large. It could not, and would not, be decided by the application of conventional military force alone. This paper uses an abbreviated examination of the Southern Campaign (1780-1782) to explore the principal causes and enduring lessons of British strategic failure in America. Unwilling to destroy the colonies in order to save them, British military strategy became a reluctant prisoner of deeply flawed strategic assumptions, a government that failed to determine a realistic and militarily attainable political objective, and a blatant inability to accurately determine the kind of war upon which the nation was engaged until it was far too late. In the process, the British learned that battlefield brilliance seldom rescues bad strategy, there are, in fact, limits to what military force can achieve, and national leaders who base their plans and policies primarily on hope and a stubborn belief in the sanctity of their concerted views, if wrong, can lead a nation to disaster.

Publication Date:
Oct 28 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
1503003132 / 9781503003132
Page Count:
34
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / United States / Revolutionary War

12.95

The American Revolutionary War: The Northern Campaigns

The American Revolutionary War: The Northern Campaigns published on

Authored by Matthew Forney Steele
Edited by Walter H.T. Seager

The American Revolutionary War: The Northern Campaigns is a comprehensive review of the northern American Revolutionary War battles. It was written by then Major Matthew Forney Steele, Second United States Cavalry in 1909 and issued by the War Department.

Publication Date:
Oct 16 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
1502852039 / 9781502852038
Page Count:
28
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
6″ x 9″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / United States / Revolutionary War

9.95

An Examination of George Washington’s Employment of the Pennsylvania Militia at the Battles of Trenton and Princeton

An Examination of George Washington’s Employment of the Pennsylvania Militia at the Battles of Trenton and Princeton published on

Authored by U.S. Army War College

The short winter campaign of 1776-1777, including the Battles of Trenton and Princeton, is one of the most important campaigns of the Revolutionary War. This short campaign kept the colonial army and the revolutionary cause alive at a critical time.

All combat units are not equal. Washington knew it during this campaign, just as we know it now. As a strategic leader his mission was to capitalize on the strengths of each available unit by assigning it appropriate missions, while at the same time minimizing the risks to the unit. By looking at his employment of the Pennsylvania militia and Associators at Trenton and Princeton, we can see that Washington was developing good techniques for maximizing the effectiveness of the militiamen.

In this short campaign George Washington took maximum advantage of the militia’s strengths and used them mainly in supporting attacks, economy of force missions and as security forces designed to provide early warning. When he needed to use militia in more direct attacks or in holding defensive positions, he interspersed them with the regulars to give them an example to follow when battle was engaged. During movements he positioned militia units in the line of march between Continental units to literally “keep them in line.” The regulars were assigned the more difficult missions that required maneuver of larger elements and more restrictive discipline.

The techniques used by George Washington in this short campaign to handle the militia served him well throughout the rest of the revolution. As a leader, he overcame his prejudices toward the ruffians of the militia and developed techniques that allowed him to use them to their maximum effectiveness and at the same time protect their weaknesses.

Publication Date:
Sep 04 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
1501055356 / 9781501055355
Page Count:
26
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / United States / Revolutionary War

14.95

A Comparative Evaluation of British and American Strategy in the Southern Campaign of 1780-1781

A Comparative Evaluation of British and American Strategy in the Southern Campaign of 1780-1781 published on

Authored by U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

This book is an analysis and evaluation of the British and American campaign strategies in the Southern Campaign of the War for American Independence. After over four and one-half years of inconclusive fighting in America, the British government developed a plan to restore Royal control of the American South where large numbers of Loyalist Americans were expected to rally in support of the Crown. Control of the southern provinces would allow the British army to isolate the North where the rebellion was strongest. In May 1780, the American army of the South surrendered to a British army at Charlestowne, South Carolina. The Americans raised a new army in the South, but it too was decisively defeated at Camden, South Carolina, in August 1780. American prospects in the Southern Department appeared bleak until the arrival of Nathanael Greene in December 1780. Despite a scarcity of resources, Greene rebuilt the American southern army and fought an inspired campaign of compound warfare to counter the expanding British control of the Carolinas. Lord Cornwallis led the British army on a protracted pursuit of Greene’s forces across North Carolina following the American victory at Cowpens in January 1781. The British army, operating well beyond its supply lines, was exhausted by the pursuit of Greene. Despite winning a narrow tactical victory at Guilford Courthouse in March of 1781, the British force was rendered operationally ineffective. Cornwallis withdrew to Virginia where he would ultimately be trapped at Yorktown.

This book demonstrates the application of operational design using the British and American strategies in the Southern Campaign as a historical case study. The methodology for this study is based on the linkages between ends, ways, and means through the elements of operational design. Nathanael Greene ultimately succeeded because he implemented a strategy that was designed to match his means to his ends.

Publication Date:
Sep 04 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
1501057634 / 9781501057632
Page Count:
100
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / United States / Revolutionary War

14.95

Nathanael Greene’s Implementation of Compound Warfare During the Southern Campaign of the American Revolution

Nathanael Greene’s Implementation of Compound Warfare During the Southern Campaign of the American Revolution published on

Authored by Command and General Staff College

This work is an analysis and evaluation of Major General Nathanael Greene’s implemention of compound warfare in the Southern Department from December 1780 until the British surrender at Yorktown in October 1781. Major General Greene was appointed as the new commander of the Southern Department in December 1780 following the Continental Army’s catastrophic defeat at the Battle of Camden. Greene’s arrival signaled a new beginning for American efforts in the South. Charged with the Herculean task of confronting an enemy that was better equipped and in control of the major sea ports of the region, Greene devised a strategy that would counter British control of the Carolinas and Georgia. He decided to cultivate an operational relationship with the partisan leaders in the region. Greene accomplished this by first writing his vision of partisans working with regular troops and then implementing this strategy over a short period of time. By working with the partisans Greene received three major services in return. The partisans collected copious amounts of operational and tactical intelligence on the British, they prevented the British from operating unhindered in the region, and they were significant warfighters in combined operations with Continental troops.

Greene’s inspired leadership, coupled with his utilization of the partisan forces under men like Francis Marion, Thomas Sumter and Andrew Pickens, led to the Americans taking control of a vital region a scant ten months after he took command. Greene defeated the British by fist implementing a strategy of exhaustion during his retreat to the Dan River in early 1780. Following his successful retreat Greene then took advantage of his partisans and conventional forces mobility by destroying British outposts and lines of communication in South Carolina and Georgia. The end result was the British were rendered ineffective in the interior of these colonies and they were forced to take refuge in Virginia where they later surrendered at Yorktown.

This work demonstrates that Greene was one of the most effective American generals during the course of the American Revolution because of his willingness to work with partisans and his ability to fight the British on his terms. Major General Nathanael Greene was a bold and audacious commander who implemented a strategy that resulted in victory in the Southern Department of the United States.

Publication Date:
Aug 05 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
1500748463 / 9781500748463
Page Count:
48
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
History / United States / Revolutionary War

14.95

Primary Sidebar