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Banking Basics

Banking Basics published on

Authored by Federal Reserve

Some young savers stash their cash in shoe boxes or jelly jars. Others use “piggy banks,” which today look more like spaceships or cartoon characters.
In any case, the same problem arises. Sooner or later, the piggy bank or jelly jar fills up, and you have to make a decision: Should I spend the money or continue to save? And if I continue to save, should I open a bank account or just find a bigger jar?
Maybe you’ve had to face such a decision yourself. If you decide to keep your money at home, it will just sit there and won’t earn any extra money for you. You also run the risk that a burglar, a fire, or some other disaster will wipe out your savings in the wink of an eye.
Then again, if you open a bank account, you can’t “visit” your money as easily as you can when it sits in your dresser drawer. You can’t just walk into a bank in the middle of the night to count your cash. You can’t run the coins through your fingers or toss the bills in the air and let them rain down on your head.
Opening a bank account is a big step because you are putting your money in someone else’s hands. You’re counting on someone else to handle your money responsibly. Before you do that, it might be a good idea to understand how banks operate.
That’s the purpose of this pamphlet. It won’t tell you everything there is to know about banks and banking, but we hope it will be a good basic introduction.

Publication Date:
Apr 07 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1511614692 / 9781511614696
Page Count:
44
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
Education / Finance

14.95

Research and Evaluation on the Investigation and Adjudication of Campus Sexual Assault

Research and Evaluation on the Investigation and Adjudication of Campus Sexual Assault published on

Authored by U.S. Department of the Justice

The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is seeking applications for research and evaluation related to the investigation and adjudication of sexual assaults on college and university campuses. The White House Task Force to Protect Students From Sexual Assault identified a need to improve understanding of current practices in campus investigation and judicial decision-making involving student-on-student sexual assault. This program furthers the Department’s mission by encouraging and supporting research, development, and evaluation to improve criminal justice policy and practice in the United States.

Publication Date:
Feb 18 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1508527830 / 9781508527831
Page Count:
30
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
Education / Educational Policy & Reform

12.95

Sexual Violence on Campus: How too many institutions of higher education are failing to protect students

Sexual Violence on Campus: How too many institutions of higher education are failing to protect students published on

Authored by U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Financial & Contracting Oversight

At the request of Chairman Claire McCaskill, this report assesses how colleges and universities report, investigate, and adjudicate sexual violence. The report is based on a survey of 440 four-year institutions of higher education, which includes a national sample and separate samples of the nation’s largest public and private institutions. It also draws on interviews with stakeholders and three roundtable discussions held by the Subcommittee on Financial and Contracting Oversight in 2014.

The survey results showed that many institutions are failing to comply with the law and best practices in how they handle sexual violence among students. These problems affect nearly every stage of the institutions’ responses to sexual violence.

-Lack of Knowledge About the Scope of the Problem. According to the most recent report conducted by the Department of Justice, less than 5% of rape victims attending college report their attack to law enforcement. Experts agree that annual climate surveys-confidential student surveys regarding behaviors that constitute or are associated with sexual assault-are one of the best ways to get an accurate portrait of sexual assault issues on a campus. However, only 16% of the institutions in the Subcommittee’s national sample conduct climate surveys.

-Failure to Encourage Reporting of Sexual Violence. Many policies and procedures have been shown to improve reporting of sexual violence on college campuses. These include allowing reports to be made via a hotline or website, designating an official who can receive reports, and permitting survivor reports to be kept confidentially. However, only 51% of institutions in the national sample provide a hotline to survivors and only 44% of institutions in the national sample provide the option to report sexual assaults online. Approximately 8% of institutions still do not allow confidential reporting.

-Lack of Adequate Sexual Assault Training. More than 20% of institutions in the national sample provide no sexual assault response training at all for members of their faculty and staff. More than 30% of schools do not provide any sexual assault training for students.

-Reported Sexual Violence Goes Uninvestigated. Federal law requires every institution that knows or reasonably should have known about sexual violence to conduct an investigation to determine what occurred. More than 40% of schools in the national sample have not conducted a single investigation in the past five years. More than 20%of the nationƒ?(tm)s largest private institutions conducted fewer investigations than the number of incidents they reported to the Department of Education, with some institutions reporting as many as seven times more incidents of sexual violence than they have investigated.

-Lack of Adequate Services for Survivors. Sexual violence survivors may need a variety of services, such as academic and residential accommodations, to enable them to continue their education after the assault. While most schools reported using a team approach to respond to sexual assaults, their approach often does not includerepresentatives of services that could help the survivor. For example, only 25% of institutions that use a team approach incorporate the local prosecutorƒ?(tm)s office. And though more than 90% of institutions state that sexual assault survivors have access to community victim assistance/advocacy programs, only 51% of schools reported incorporating those services into their team approach. Most institutions also fail to provide access to a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE), a specially trained nurse who can provide medical and other services to survivors of sexual assault.

Publication Date:
Jan 16 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1507582293 / 9781507582299
Page Count:
120
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
Education / Educational Policy & Reform

12.95

Helping the Student with Diabetes Succeed: A Guide for School Personnel

Helping the Student with Diabetes Succeed: A Guide for School Personnel published on

Authored by U.S. Department of Health

Working with a group of diabetes and education experts concerned about diabetes in the school setting, NDEP has revised the school guide to reflect updates in diabetes management and to incorporate user feedback. In this updated edition, you will find new and revised information on topics, including:
* effective diabetes management for children with type 2 diabetes
* diabetes equipment and supplies for blood glucose monitoring and administering insulin meal planning and carbohydrate counting
* stages of child development and students’ abilities to perform diabetes care tasks
* diabetes management training for school personnel
* roles and responsibilities for key school personnel, the parents/guardian, and students with diabetes
* Federal laws and diabetes education and training resources.

Publication Date:
Dec 09 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
1505432804 / 9781505432800
Page Count:
152
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
Education / General

12.95

Higher Education, Innovation & Entrepreneurship in Focus

Higher Education, Innovation & Entrepreneurship in Focus published on

Authored by Office of Innovation and Entrepreneurship Economic Development Administration, National Advisory Council on Innovation and Entrepreneurship, U.S. Department of Commerce

America’s innovative and entrepreneurial culture is often regarded as one of this country’s greatest national advantages in an increasingly competitive world. This innovation infrastructure includes a large number of universities and colleges, research institutions, laboratories, and start up companies all across the United States – from major cities to rural areas. Every day, these institutions, often in partnership with federal agencies, develop breakthrough technologies in the life sciences, energy, telecommunications, information technology, education, social innovation, and other areas. This, in turn, has attracted many of the world’s best and brightest people to pursue careers in R&D and innovation in the United States. Many of these same minds become leaders and entrepreneurs across the nation – creating cutting-edge innovation products and services and building our great companies.

As other nations increasingly compete with the United States for leadership in innovation, America’s colleges and universities are doing their part to maintain our leadership and to nurture more innovation, create processes and programs to commercialize that innovation, and promote entrepreneurship as a viable career path for students. Universities use different approaches to encourage innovative thinking. Their approaches depend on their local environment and objectives, which in turn varies on geography, institutional size, history, culture, and funding resources. This diversity of approaches is proving to be both appropriate and successful for universities and colleges as they seek to create academic and economic benefits through innovation and entrepreneurship.

Across the United States, state and local governments, economic development agencies, non-profits, universities, and business groups are trying to develop innovation ecosystems that foster market focused innovation and nurture startup companies to drive job creation. They all share some common goals – to find ways to create millions of new jobs in emerging industries where the United States can maintain its economic leadership, gain market share or create entirely new industries. At the same time, the challenges of globalization require that America remain nimble and constantly deliver new, innovative products and services. Research has shown that business startups and surviving young firms disproportionately create jobs relative to their size in the U.S. economy. For example, while firm startups only account for roughly three percent of total U.S. employment in any given year, they are responsible for about 20 percent of gross job creation.

For the United States to remain economically competitive there is need for a strong national infrastructure to commercialize innovation and support high-growth entrepreneurship. If the nation needs to create millions of jobs, and many jobs are created by startup companies, then America will need to significantly increase the number of high-quality, startup companies in the coming years. In the United States, universities are a significant source of the ideas and R&D that are the value proposition of these high-growth startups. But those startups cannot be based solely in the traditional centers of American innovation, such as Silicon Valley, Boston, New York, and North Carolina. In order to develop local entrepreneurial ecosystems, these start ups must also be based in new cities and rural communities in order to build their long-term economic prospects.

Publication Date:
Nov 12 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
1503186571 / 9781503186576
Page Count:
102
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
Education / Higher

14.95

Special Agent Entrance Exam Preparation Guide

Special Agent Entrance Exam Preparation Guide published on

Authored by U.S. Department of Homeland Security

The purpose of this preparation guide is to help you prepare to take the Special Agent Entrance Exam (SAEE). This guide will familiarize you with the sections of the SAEE and provide you with sample test questions and explanations for the correct answers to these questions.

The preparation guide is organized into three chapters. The first chapter provides an introduction to the test, to include summary information about the five sections of the test. The second chapter provides detailed instructions of each test section and sample test questions with explanations. The final chapter provides information on test preparation including test taking tips.

Publication Date:
Nov 07 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
1503110834 / 9781503110830
Page Count:
50
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
Education / Reference

12.95

Campus Threat Assessment Case Studies: A Training Tool for Investigation, Evaluation, and Intervention

Campus Threat Assessment Case Studies: A Training Tool for Investigation, Evaluation, and Intervention published on

Authored by U.S. Department of Justice

The Campus Threat Assessment Case Study Guide: A Training Tool for Investigation, Evaluation, and Intervention will allow threat assessment team members to explore and practice threat assessment through small and large group exercises using pre-developed case studies. This guide will also strengthen team members’ comprehension and application of the threat assessment principles proscribed in “Campus Threat Assessment Training: A Multidisciplinary Approach for Institutions of Higher Education,” a program developed and delivered nationwide by Margolis Healy & Associates and funded by the COPS Office.

Publication Date:
Nov 06 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
1503110931 / 9781503110939
Page Count:
90
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
Education / Violence & Harassment

14.95

Sexual Violence at Institutions of Higher Education

Sexual Violence at Institutions of Higher Education published on

Authored by Congressional Research Service

In recent years, a number of high-profile incidents of sexual violence at institutions of higher education (IHEs) have heightened congressional and administration scrutiny of the policies and procedures that IHEs currently have in place to address campus sexual violence and how these policies and procedures can be improved. Campus sexual violence is widely acknowledged to be a problem. However, reported data on the extent of sexual violence at IHEs varies considerably across studies for a variety of methodological and other reasons. Victims of sexual violence may suffer from a range of physical and mental health conditions including injuries, pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, suicidality, and substance abuse. College students who are the victims of sexual violence may experience a decline in academic performance, and they may drop out, leave school, or transfer.

Currently, there are two federal laws that address sexual violence on college campuses: the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act, P.L. 101-542) and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (Title IX, P.L. 92-318). These two statutes differ in significant respects, including in their purpose, coverage, enforcement, and remedies.

The Clery Act requires all public and private IHEs that participate in the student financial assistance programs under Title IV of the Higher Education Act (HEA, P.L. 89-329) of 1965 to track crimes in and around their campuses and to report these data to their campus community and to the Department of Education (ED). ED’s Federal Student Aid (FSA) Office oversees educational institutions’ compliance with Title IV student financial aid requirements, including requirements related to the Clery Act. In this role, FSA conducts program reviews of IHEs’ compliance with student aid and Clery provisions.

Title IX is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex under any education program or activity that receives federal funding. Under Title IX, sexual harassment, which includes sexual violence, is a form of unlawful sex discrimination. Unlike the Clery Act, whose coverage is limited to IHEs that receive student financial aid funds under the HEA, Title IX is applicable to recipients of any type of federal education funding, including any public or private elementary, secondary, and postsecondary school that receives such funds. Although each federal agency enforces Title IX compliance among its own recipients, ED, which administers the vast majority of federal education programs, is the primary agency conducting administrative enforcement of Title IX. Such enforcement by ED’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) may occur as part of a routine compliance audit or in response to a complaint filed by an individual.

Members of Congress have been actively involved in seeking ways to improve how IHEs respond to, investigate, and adjudicate incidents of campus sexual violence. Several bills that would strengthen existing laws pertaining to campus sexual violence have been introduced during the 113th Congress. In January 2014, the Obama Administration established a White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. In April 2014, the Task Force issued its first report-Not Alone- and created a website that addresses campus sexual violence. Among other things, the report included an extensive list of actions that the Administration will take (or has already taken) to address campus sexual violence.

Publication Date:
Oct 23 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
1503006816 / 9781503006812
Page Count:
30
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
Education / Higher

19.95

The National Guard in the Spanish-American War and Philippine Insurrection, 1898-1899

The National Guard in the Spanish-American War and Philippine Insurrection, 1898-1899 published on

Authored by U.S. Department of justice

Community policing has been a prevailing approach to public safety for the past three decades. When properly implemented, community policing improves civic engagement of local residents, gives them stake in coproducing outcomes with local police, and increases police legitimacy in the eyes of the public. Community policing’s broad approach places a greater emphasis on proactive and preventive policing and has been applied to a diverse array of public safety concerns, including child safety, traditional crime, and gangs. The same community policing strategies and principles that have helped improve public safety and reduce crime and social disorder are now being leveraged to counter terrorism and prevent violent extremism. This guide discusses five key principles of community policing applied to homeland security concerns and provides practical examples from law enforcement agencies implementing community policing approaches to counter violent extremism.

Publication Date:
Nov 06 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
150310270X / 9781503102705
Page Count:
40
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
Political Science / Political Freedom & Security / Terrorism

12.95

No Child Left Behind: Giving Parents Options

No Child Left Behind: Giving Parents Options published on

Authored by U.S. Department of Education

One of the four pillars of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 is options for parents in educating their children. Under No Child Left Behind, local school districts must offer certain parents of students attending Title I schools identified as in need of school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring the option of selecting “public school choice” or “supplemental educational services” (SES) for their child. Access to these options by parents depends on two factors: student eligibility and the status of their child’s school. For public school choice, all students enrolled in Title I schools that are in the first year of school improvement and subsequent years may participate. For SES, students from low-income families who are enrolled in Title I schools in the second year of school improvement and subsequent years are eligible.

Public school choice gives parents of eligible students the option of transferring their child to another public school in their district. The transfer options available to parents through this provision of the law may include traditional public as well as charter, magnet, or virtual schools that are not identified for school improvement, corrective action, or restructuring. If more than one transfer option exists, a district must offer more than one choice to parents. Districts must pay for or provide transportation to the new school, subject to funding limitations.

Supplemental educational services are provided outside of the regular school day to increase student achievement and may include assistance such as tutoring, remediation, and other academic interventions. Parents of eligible students may obtain these services for their child free of charge from an approved SES provider of their choice. State education agencies (SEAs) are responsible for approving SES providers and providing local districts with lists of approved providers serving their area.

The public school choice and SES provisions of No Child Left Behind are integral components of district efforts to improve schools and increase individual student achievement. By expanding the field of schools available to parents, public school choice gives schools a greater incentive to undertake the reforms needed to improve student learning. By providing opportunities for students to receive additional high-quality instruction outside of school, SES also makes a key contribution to districts’ improvement efforts. Both provisions aim to give students access to high-quality learning environments.

Publication Date:
Sep 24 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
150247493X / 9781502474933
Page Count:
46
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
Education / General

16.95

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