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Introduction to Renewable Energy Technology: A Year Long Science & Technology Course

Introduction to Renewable Energy Technology: A Year Long Science & Technology Course published on

Authored by U.S. Department of Energy

High schools struggle to get and keep students engaged in the study of science, while industry struggles to attract employees with advanced technical skills. As construction trades and science teachers, we see a great opportunity to combine the growing national interest in renewable energy with lab science and hands-on skills to provide a truly integrated, contextual curriculum to engage students. Renewable energy provides a political, economic and technical framework for the study of scientific concepts and methodology. Renewable energy utilization rests on the development of advanced technical skills: engineering research and design; electrical power production, transmission and utilization; manufacturing; transportation modeling; urban planning and design among others. The translating of scientific concepts into working physical models offers unparalleled opportunities for students to practice creative and critical thinking, and to problem-solve in a tangible context.

Publication Date:
Feb 03 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1507827105 / 9781507827109
Page Count:
98
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
Science / Energy

12.95

About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines: Transporting Natural Gas

About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines: Transporting Natural Gas published on

Authored by Energy Information Administration

Through a series of interconnecting interstate and intrastate pipelines the transportation of natural gas from one location to another within the United States has become a relatively seamless operation. While intrastate pipeline systems often transport natural gas from production areas directly to consumers in locan markets, it is the interstate pipeline system’s long-distance, high-capacity trunklines that supply most of the major natural gas markets in the United States.

Publication Date:
Jan 20 2015
ISBN/EAN13:
1507635796 / 9781507635797
Page Count:
76
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
Science / Energy

12.95

The Long Island Solar Farm

The Long Island Solar Farm published on

Authored by U.S. Department of Energy

In November 2011, a utility-scale solar array became operational in the most unlikely of places, at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Eastern Long Island, New York. The Long Island Solar Farm project came together as a joint effort of five very different interest groups: a federal agency, a research institution, an electric utility, a private business, and the general public. The project is remarkable for three major reasons: first, it is the largest utility-scale solar power plant in the Eastern United States; second, it is a commercial project built on federally administered public lands; and third, the project was very unlikely to have started in the first place.

The process by which the Long Island Solar Farm was developed is intricate and unusual. This reflects many of the nuanced conditions that made siting the solar farm on federal property a unique opportunity for very different groups. Though many of these nuances make the Long Island Solar Farm difficult to imitate as a template, the research aspects of the project make it a trailblazing resource to inform future development of photovoltaic (PV) solar projects in the East. Furthermore, the innovation in attitude it took to develop this project serves as an excellent model for large-scale solar power development and public-private partnerships in general.

Publication Date:
Nov 01 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
1503026647 / 9781503026643
Page Count:
60
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
Science / Energy

12.95

Wind Powering America’s Wind for Schools Project: Summary Report

Wind Powering America’s Wind for Schools Project: Summary Report published on

Authored by National Renewable Energy Laboratory

As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce to support it. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a report describing a 20% wind energy future by 2030, which noted that 500,000 new annual full-time equivalent jobs would be created under this scenario.

Publication Date:
Oct 17 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
1502868237 / 9781502868237
Page Count:
80
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
Science / Energy

11.95

International Energy Outlook 2014

International Energy Outlook 2014 published on

Authored by Environmental Protection Agency

World markets for petroleum and other liquid fuels have entered a period of dynamic change-in both supply and demand. Potential new supplies of oil from tight and shale resources have raised optimism for significant new sources of global liquids. The potential for growth in demand for liquid fuels is focused on the emerging economies of China, India, and the Middle East, while liquid fuels demand in the United States, Europe, and other regions with well-established oil markets seems to have peaked. After a long period of sustained high oil prices, improvements in conservation and efficiency have reduced or slowed the growth of liquid fuels use among mature oil consumers. The changes in the overall market environment have led the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) to focus on reassessing long-term trends in liquid fuels markets for the 2014 edition of its International Energy Outlook (IEO2014).

IEO2014 projections of future liquids balances include two broad categories: crude and lease condensate and other liquid fuels. Crude and lease condensate includes tight oil, shale oil, extra-heavy crude oil, field condensate, and bitumen (i.e., oil sands, either diluted or upgraded). Other liquids refer to natural gas plant liquids (NGPL), biofuels (including biomass-to-liquids [BTL]), gas-to-liquids (GTL), coal-to-liquids (CTL), kerogen (i.e., oil shale), and refinery gain.

After the oil crises of the 1970s and 1980s, much of the debate about world oil markets centered on the limitations of supply. Energy security was (and remains) a major concern, with large resource deposits located in and controlled by members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). In addition, strong increases in demand for oil and a limited supply response to rising prices in the mid-2000s led to increasingly vocal concerns about resource depletion. More recently, with higher sustained world oil prices-by historic measures-and advances in extraction technologies, growing supplies of tight oil and shale oil in the United States have brought new resources to market, beginning in North America and, eventually, in other parts of the world. There is also hope that recent legislative changes in Mexico will reverse that country’s recent trend of slowly declining oil production. Outside North America, the potential for large production increases in Brazil, Argentina, and elsewhere could help ensure the availability of liquid fuels supplies for many years.

Publication Date:
Oct 07 2014
ISBN/EAN13:
1502738392 / 9781502738394
Page Count:
60
Binding Type:
US Trade Paper
Trim Size:
8.5″ x 11″
Language:
English
Color:
Black and White
Related Categories:
Science / Energy

14.95

The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS): Compliance and Penalties – IF10121

The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS): Compliance and Penalties – IF10121 published on

The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) requires that renewable fuel be blended into the nation’s transportation fuel supply. However, it does not explicitly require the production of biofuels. The mandate—based on volume (in billions of gallons)—increases annually from 9.0 billion gallons in 2008 to 36.0 billion gallons in 2022 (see Figure 1). Within the overall RFS mandate, there is a smaller mandate to use advanced biofuels, which include fuels other than cornstarch ethanol that meet greenhouse gas emission reduction requirements relative to gasoline. Two subcategories of the advanced biofuel category specifically identified in the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA; P.L. 110-140) are cellulosic biofuels and biomass based diesel. The advanced biofuel category also includes other fuels, such as biogas and butanol. Outside of the advanced biofuel requirement, the remainder of the RFS generally is met using ethanol produced from cornstarch.

Date of Report: June 19, 2015
Pages: 2
Order Number: IF10121
Price: $5.95

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Tesla’s Home Battery—An Electricity Storage Breakthrough? – IN10271

Tesla’s Home Battery—An Electricity Storage Breakthrough? – IN10271 published on

Cost-effective electricity storage has long been a kind of "Holy Grail" for the electric power sector. Such storage technology could have multiple benefits for electricity consumers. It can serve as a temporary source of backup power to maintain on-site electric service in the event of a utility power blackout. It can be used to improve the availability of ("firm up") electricity generated from intermittent renewable sources such as solar and wind. It can also be used to shift end-user electricity loads from costly peak hours to lower cost off-peak hours, which can level regional generation profiles and lower customer electric bills. In pursuit of these benefits, many electricity storage solutions have been developed, and some have become commercially available—primarily at utility scale—but high costs and performance issues (along with key regulatory barriers) have limited their deployment. (See CRS Report R42455, Energy Storage for Power Grids and Electric Transportation: A Technology Assessment.) For example, banks of lead-acid batteries have been used to firm up generation from some renewable power installations. However, the economics and environmental characteristics of these batteries are unlikely to provide a long-term answer. Lithium ion batteries, another mature technology, have a better energy density and higher cycle life compared to lead-acid batteries, but they are much more expensive to manufacture. Other advanced battery technologies and kinetic and chemical-based energy storage systems are also being pursued.

Date of Report: 5/4/2015
Pages: 2
Order Number: IN10271
Price: $5.95

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Antitrust Case Complicates Israel’s Energy Future – IF10140

Antitrust Case Complicates Israel’s Energy Future – IF10140 published on

In 2009 and 2010, U.S.-based exploration and production (E&P) company Noble Energy (see below for brief description), along with its private Israel-based partners, made two large natural gas discoveries offshore of Israel—the Tamar and Leviathan fields, respectively. Israel does not have a significant E&P sector and thus relies on the expertise of international companies, particularly in offshore work. These discoveries, and the production from Tamar that began in 2013, have changed Israel’s energy consumption mix, strengthened its energy security, lowered its carbon emissions, and led to trade benefits.

Date of Report: February 27, 2015
Pages: 2
Order Number: IF10140
Price: $5.95

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Phone: 301-253-0881  

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Energy and Mineral Development on Federal Land – IF10127

Energy and Mineral Development on Federal Land – IF10127 published on

Energy production on federal lands accounts for a significant amount of total U.S. energy production. For example, in FY2013, approximately 27% of crude oil, 18% of natural gas, and 41% of coal production came from federal lands. Geothermal electric generating capacity on federal lands represents 40% of U.S total geothermal capacity.  Solar and wind energy potential on federal lands is growing and based on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) approved projects,  there is potential for 5,000 megawatts (MW) of wind and nearly 8,800 MW of solar energy annual capacity on federal lands, although currently the level of generation is low. The volumes and value of non-fuel mineral production on federal lands are uncertain because there are no reporting requirements, but could be high, especially for gold, the primary mineral mined (by value) on federal lands.  Three royalty debates may be revived in the 114th Congress: (1) whether to increase the statutory minimum rate for onshore federal oil and gas leases from 12.5% to 18.75%, (2) whether to enact revenue sharing laws for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) leases to include all coastal states, and (3) whether to charge a royalty on hardrock locatable minerals produced on federal public domain lands. 

Date of Report: February 6, 2015
Pages: 2
Order Number: IF10127
Price: $5.95

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The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS): Compliance and Penalties – IF10121

The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS): Compliance and Penalties – IF10121 published on

The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) requires that renewable fuel be blended into the nation’s transportation fuel supply. However, it does not explicitly require the production of biofuels. The mandate—based on volume (in billions of gallons)—increases annually from 9.0 billion gallons in 2008 to 36.0 billion gallons in 2022 (see Figure 1). Within the overall RFS mandate, there is a smaller mandate to use advanced biofuels, which include fuels other than cornstarch ethanol that meet greenhouse gas emission reduction requirements relative to gasoline. Two subcategories of the advanced biofuel category specifically identified in the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA; P.L. 110-140) are cellulosic biofuels and biomass-based diesel. The advanced biofuel category also includes other fuels, such as biogas and butanol. Outside of the advanced biofuel requirement, the remainder of the RFS generally is met using ethanol produced from cornstarch.

Date of Report: February 5, 2015
Pages: 2
Order Number: IF10121
Price: $5.95

To Order: 

CLICK:HERE  to use the SECURE SHOPPING CART

Email: congress@pennyhill.com

Phone: 301-253-0881 

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